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White British Actors/tresses Told to Leave Bollywood

Posted by bwmm on May 19, 2010

British, American etc. Actors Told to Leave Bollywood Apparently this goes for U. S.  as well.  Didn’t even know that U. S. Actors/tresses were getting into bwood.

What do you think of these events?

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3 Responses to “White British Actors/tresses Told to Leave Bollywood”

  1. Sandra77 said

    I had heard about white actors (including blond actresses) moving to Bollywood because their skin color and looks are so “worshipped” in India and Pakistan (whereas in their home countries they were just another set of out-of-work actors). I guess now that skin lightening creams have made Indian/Pakistani actors pale enough to pass, they don’t need the “authentic” white actors anymore.

  2. scificrazy said

    Not all Indians worship light skin like not all black people or other darker skinned people do. It’s sad when the majority of Indians are dark skinned. Plus skin lightening creams can be dangerous as many AA’s found out. Or at least using it what it wasn’t intended for. The thing is we had a black is beautiful movement. There are still AA’s who use these types of creams to be lighter. Plus men validate beauty and many of the ones (who have the power and are validating the beauty standards for Bollywood)are men (producers) remember directors can be hired and fired. Don’t know if it’s changed, but at one time as in other movie industries mafias and other crime figures fund films being made. In some countries they even tell the producers etc. who to cast. You also have to take into account is that the actors/actress, directors, producers who make it in the Industry or at least have a bigger foot in the door are usually related to someone within the industry. Nepitism like you wouldn’t believe. In America most actors try to distance themselves from already famous parents or family members. You don’t have a leg up just because you are Nick Cages kid or nephew. Nick Cage isn’t even Nick Cage he’s Nick Coppola (Frances Ford Coppolas nephew)Even Michael Douglas had to work hard to become the star he is or even get in. He worked as a producer. Made a movie and cast himself, Romancing the Stone so being the son of Kurt Douglas didn’t give him a leg up or any ups or downs for that money. He had to do it for himself.

    But remember Bollywood isn’t the only film industry in India or surrounding countries. It’s only one of many industries

    As for reasons which are the same for us

    Question: “What countries that have darker skinned variants don’t have any prejudice against them? I have a friend from Chile who was darker skinned than the rest of his family. He said there was definitely a stigma against it among his upper middle class friends. I’m just wondering if any country is immune from that attitude.”

    Reply: “These cultures didn’t wake up and say out the blue, “hey I want to hate myself and look the total opposite of me.” A lot of the countries that do have color issues experienced imperialism or colonization at the hands of white Europeans or paler Arabs. The desire to be lighter was a result of the desire to be associated with the new ruling class, which were the lighter-skinned invaders. There’s a whole lot of psychological damage at work here. The truth is that no matter what you look like you should love and appreciate yourself. And a person who loves and appreciates themselves doesn’t have to make others feel less than they are. Period. Something for all of us to remember!”

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2010/04/13/vogue-india-dispels-dark_n_535802.html article

    http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20100310143055AAU2usf the second person says settled I say invaded. And the not having narrow noses like Indians (like this person can talk for all Indians or surrounding areas facial features since as with most humans even within the same ethnicity varies.) And the idea of dark skinned beauty being considered less attractive is still what it is colorism. He says it’s not considered unattractive just less. What a crock! Sounds like how colorist bm talk about dark skinned bw. Please!

    With India’s economy rising and later power I have a feeling they aren’t going to be so in awe of the west. Maybe I’m wrong don’t know. But I’ve heard from many other Indians that because of the dangers with lightening creams some have stopped using them. Maybe that means there will be some sort of movement for them in the future.

    Frankly I think Indian producers need to that F. U. attitude you were talking about. They need to ask what has Hollywood ever done for Indians even the ones who are American. Same with Britain. I mean you have M. Night and not an Indian in site in his films mostly just himself. I wonder if something like Nollywood would even help?

  3. bwmm said

    Indians aren’t the only ones still using it. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wEvvK-5jBkY Hell now they are even marketing Fair and Lovely to men. Hell Amitabh Bachan (one of the biggest if not the biggest Bollywood star) was told he was too dark for Bollywood. He showed them. He did voice overs and worked hard to get a foot in the door and look at him now he is a house hold name and a legend. Now he has made comments on color that made other Indians not so color struck cringe, but when you think about it his generation really had colorism on the brain as they weren’t that far from Colonialism. But I do have to wonder if he considered too dark (he was dark skinned, but not very) than how light or dark would someone have had to been back then.

    And as for Africans being darker than even the darkest African is a crock of ish. I’ve seen Indians I’ve thought were either AA’s or African until either said other wise or started speaking. Hell I go to an African American fireman’s ball that is hosted every Christmas eve (charity)and there is this one man who is dark skinned and could pass for a dark skinned (black) Indian and in fact people have assumed he was Indian only to be shocked when he says he’s AA.

    I also hear many Indians say that most of the actors/tresses are dark skinned and that the use make-up and lighting is what makes them appear lighter.

    If that’s the case that’s a scary thing to have a man or woman marketing a product that they don’t use, but the effect for them is just make up and lighting. We all know that’s probably the case. That’s like those diet spokes models who try to sell exercise or diet pills, food regimen, but really used lipo or other methods usually life threatening (a cousin died after getting a tummy tuck). It’s also like Beyonce and others who wear weaves (have nothing against them I wear an have worn ones myself)promoting products for long shiny hair when they are up under weaves with natural hair or short hair etc. Many bw and girls have hurt their hair trying to live up to these standards and they weren’t real in the first place. Selling a perm when you know you are in a weave and are natural just gets my goat.

    I have much respect for Aishwariya Rai for rejecting such ads. Hell this could hurt her career, turning down ads etc. Hopefully she doesn’t cave and do them anyway. The backlash SRK got for doing one (might not have hurt him)but many Indians were disappointed in him for doing one. I know I was as he’s one of my fave actors in bwood along with Amitabh and his son Abhishek (he better not get all crazy with the lightening that man is fine (Foyhne)the way he is.

    I really don’t want to get into a light versus dark skinned debate or straight versus natural or real vs. perm etc. and no ugliness, but I do think this is something that needs talking about.

    Also the fact that like you said they need to get an F. U. attitude. Yes they sure do. Seriously in Hwood they still get crappy roles. There is no reciprocal action so why work so hard to give good roles to those who wouldn’t do the same. It’s not about race, but reciprocity which there is a big lack of. Many Indian film crew are also upset because they are losing jobs to others from other countries. Now that sure don’t make a damn lick of sense. If those producers really wanted to they could change things. Those with the money have the power (that’s not always the case there’s sometimes others even behind them, but please they can do something)

    I do think a type of industry ala Nollywood could work there. It doesn’t have to be video it could be shot on film/ transferred to video and sold or shot on video an sold like Nollywood does. Self funded or funded by others etc. Nepali films are shot on or used to be shot on 16mm (don’t know if this is still the case or not.)Can’t remember if I mentioned this (and as I’m writing this I realize I’m writing something long enough to be a new article.lol sorry everyone) but one of the reasons Nollywood was unknown for so long is because it was mostly self funded on low-budget. Yes it has it’s issues with quality as well as with piracy, but the fact that it was even started in the first place is feat no one should discount.

    If the women were to create an industry even the men like bw iw would have to find producers, directors, writers, actors/tresses etc. (even if they are ones)who have their best interest at heart. That’s actually happening now in India. Women directors are coming up, but are stigmatized as possibly being feminist directors etc. or telling women’s stories (something weirdly ironic if you ask me.lol)The women directors usually can get women actors, but the men they have to look outside of bwood because many of the male stars don’t want the stigma. Seriously does that make any sense? There’s nothing wrong with recreating the Bollywood/Kollywood,Tollywood etc. style. Why wouldn’t they? just a note this applies to other film industries in India as well as other countries especially with similar movie styles as well as those industries that are not like Bollywood and the others. This also goes for other Asian countries.

    Sorry for my long winded article within an article. There are times I think I think too much.lol

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